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Super 8 Goes Up at Edmonton Fringe with Kudos to Lunchbox

2011-2012 Season,Articles and Reviews,Super 8 — Maeike van Dijk @ August 18th, 2012

Super 8, part of Lunchbox’s 2011-2012 Season is now showing at the Edmonton Fringe. In Louis B. Hobson’s review of the show, Lunchbox and our Artistic Director Pamela Halstead  get a special mention. Article below.

Read more at The Edmonton Sun

Fringe: SUPER 8

By Louis B. Hobson, August 17, The Edmonton Sun

You just know I’m going to say that Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto’s new play Super 8 is a super little comedy.

I won’t apologize because it’s not just a play on words.

This story of two lonely people who meet one night at a Super 8 motel is as charming as it is off beat.

By the end of the show you feel you know these two people and are glad you had the opportunity to spend an hour with them

That makes any comedy super.

Angie (Kira Bradley) spends too many nights at the bar in her local Super 8 because no one from town goes there. This way she can meet strangers and, for a while, pretend to be someone she isn’t.

Will (Dave Trimble) has seen far too many Super 8 motels. Exactly why this is so is one of the clever little twists in Super 8. Bradley plays brassy with ease and conviction which is why you believe Trimble is wary of her.

Some of the show’s best laughs are at Will’s expense because Trimble makes him so wonderfully timid.

The look on Trimble’s face when Bradley misinterprets what he says is hilarious.

Several times you expect him to get Bradley’s drink in his face when, in reality, he doesn’t mean to insult her.

The way Trimble gets on his bar stool gets a well-deserved laugh each time he does it. It’s an actor confident in his craft.

Julia Wasilewski’s revolving set allows us to travel from the bar to Will’s room and what happens there is a delight and very believable.

Hopkins and Wasilewski first wrote Super 8 as a 10-minute play which they took to Lunchbox Theatre’s artistic director Pamela Halstead.

To her credit she could see the potential that has been realized by Bradley, Trimble and their director Kelly Reay.

It’s super that Lunchbox is so dedicated to showcasing Calgary playwrights and sparing no expense of money and talent to do so.

4 out of 5 Suns

Mark and Charles Video Interview

Super 8,Video Interviews — Maeike van Dijk @ February 15th, 2012

In this video interview, Mark and Charles clear up some rumours the started in the blog post they wrote for us. I totally believed them last time, too.

Beatroute Preview of Super 8

Articles and Reviews,Super 8 — Maeike van Dijk @ February 13th, 2012

PLACES PLEASE :: CALGARY

By Brianna Turner

Super 8 

Lunchbox Theatre 

February 6-25

After receiving acclaim for their production in High Performance Rodeo’s 10-Minute-Play Festival in 2010, co-writers Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto realized they were on to something. For those unfamiliar with the concept, the 10-Minute-Play Festival gives local theatre companies a line of dialogue and a prop and challenges them to write and then perform a ten-minute long play in only 24 hours. Netto begins the tale of Super 8’s conception by explaining that, “They gave us a clock and the quote, ‘Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.’ We were really drawn to the image because it was not a digital clock. The idea of two hands passing, for a moment they touch and then they move on. The idea of a clock for us was the importance of a moment in time and a connection.” This imagery led them to exploring the idea of a play set in a Super 8 Motel. Now, Netto and Hopkins have expanded their ten-minute play into a full-length production, debuting this month at Lunchbox Theatre. Hopkins describes the scene: “Super 8 is set at a Super 8 motel in Aberdeen, South Dakota, where the Super 8 franchise originally began. The play begins in the bar of the motel, where these two career loners, a man and a woman, have an encounter that forever changes them… or perhaps not.” While Super 8 does explore the depths of human connection, Netto asserts that it’s also potently infused with comedy.

FFWD Preview of Super 8

Articles and Reviews,Super 8 — Maeike van Dijk @ February 13th, 2012

Super 8 fast and funny

David Trimble as Will and Kira Bradley as Angie in Super 8 by Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto. At Lunchbox Theatre, Feb 6-25 2012. Photo by Benjamin Laird.

Romantic comedy checks into Lunchbox Theatre
Published February 9, 2012  by Cadence Mandybura in Theatre

DETAILS

Super 8 presented by Lunchbox Theatre
Lunchbox Theatre
Monday, February 6 – Saturday, February 25More in: Theatre

Super 8 may be about a classic case of boy-meets-girl, but don’t expect it to be as sticky-sweet as a Valentine’s Day candy.

“It [isn’t] an overly sentimental play,” says director Kelly Reay. “It doesn’t have the clichés you associate with romantic comedy. These characters were immediately relatable, and their relationship was very true to life.”

Although the play was originally only 10 minutes long, its creators — local playwrights Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto — found the story compelling enough to expand to 50 minutes, the length of a typical Lunchbox production.

“Both stages of genesis for this play were actually pretty frenetic,” says Netto, adding that the expanded version is true to the original. “I don’t think anything hugely new necessarily entered the story, but I think we definitely worked on fleshing out the characters — who they were and what brought them to meet each other.”

The characters in question are Will (David Trimble), a travelling stranger who always stays in Super 8 motels, and Angie (Kira Bradley), a woman who frequents the Super 8’s bar.

“We have the opposites — one character who never travels and the other character who’s always on the road,” explains Reay. “Angie, she lets the world come to her, whereas Will is travelling the world.”

While it’s best to remain tight-lipped about the fast-paced plot, both Reay and Netto promise a show that will take you to unexpected places with laughs along the way, and further surprises in the shape of the set. “There’s an exciting design element that is rarely seen at Lunchbox Theatre that is going to make the shows that much more fun,” says Netto.

“It was a response to the challenge of trying to stage a play — a relatively simple and minimal play — that has multiple locations. How do you do that in simple small theatre terms? I think we came up with a pretty good solution,” adds Reay. “When you’re able to do it simply, it really cuts to the heart of the matter [and] allows us to emphasize what’s most important about this story — the relationship between these two characters.”

Read More: http://www.ffwdweekly.com/article/arts/theatre/super-8-fast-and-funny-8744/

Calgary Sun Review – Super 8

Articles and Reviews,Super 8 — Maeike van Dijk @ February 13th, 2012

 

Charming motel stay makes for Super play

BY  ,CALGARY SUN

FIRST POSTED: | UPDATED: 

You just know I’m going to say that Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto’s new play Super 8 is a super little comedy.

I won’t apologize because it’s not just a play on words.

This story of two lonely people who meet one night at a Super 8 motel is as charming as it is off beat.

By the end of the show you feel you know these two people and are glad you had the opportunity to spend an hour with them

That makes any comedy super.

Angie (Kira Bradley) spends too many nights at the bar in her local Super 8 because no one from town goes there. This way she can meet strangers and, for a while, pretend to be someone she isn’t.

Will (Dave Trimble) has seen far too many Super 8 motels. Exactly why this is so is one of the clever little twists in Super 8. Bradley plays brassy with ease and conviction which is why you believe Trimble is wary of her.

Some of the show’s best laughs are at Will’s expense because Trimble makes him so wonderfully timid.

The look on Trimble’s face when Bradley misinterprets what he says is hilarious.

Several times you expect him to get Bradley’s drink in his face when, in reality, he doesn’t mean to insult her.

The way Trimble gets on his bar stool gets a well-deserved laugh each time he does it. It’s an actor confident in his craft.

Julia Wasilewski’s revolving set allows us to travel from the bar to Will’s room and what happens there is a delight and very believable.

Hopkins and Netto first wrote Super 8 as a 10-minute play which they took to Lunchbox Theatre’s artistic director Pamela Halstead.

To her credit she could see the potential that has been realized by Bradley, Trimble and their director Kelly Reay.

It’s super that Lunchbox is so dedicated to showcasing Calgary playwrights and sparing no expense of money and talent to do so.

Read More: http://www.calgarysun.com/2012/02/10/charming-motel-stay-makes-for-super-play

Calgary Herald Review – Super 8

Articles and Reviews,Super 8 — Maeike van Dijk @ February 13th, 2012

Check in to Super 8 for an engaging stay

BY BOB CLARK, CALGARY HERALD FEBRUARY 11, 2012

Review

Lunchbox Theatre presents Super 8 by Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto through Feb. 25.

Rating 4 out of five.

Time stops for no one, but happily the hands of the clock come together just long enough for two lonely strangers to share a small piece of it in the Lunchbox Theatre show Super 8.

Well-written by Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto, Super 8 is an affecting comedy about what hap-pens when Will (played by David Trimble) and Angie (Kira Bradley) meet in the bar of the first Super 8 – in Aberdeen, S.D. – on the eve of the well-known motel chain’s rebranding.

When we first meet him, Will – who apparently makes checking into Super 8s in order to check them out his daily job – is excited enough about the impending rebranding to do an eight-count (hey, it’s Aug. 8, 2008).

Angie spends her non-working hours sitting at the Super 8 bar pretending to be other people in order to talk to strangers. At first, Angie hasn’t much of a clue why Will should care so much, let alone know so much, about Super 8s – nor why, for example, he should insist on not confusing rebranding with “logo” (a running gag between them).

When she finally finds out, she teases him with it and in pretty quick order there’s some pretty funny talk touching on everything from making bogus, albeit wildly imaginative, complaints to motel management to, um, “intimacy kits” in the room’s fridge bar.

Directed by Kelly Reay, Bradley and Trimble build and play off each other beautifully.

You find you’ve grown rather fond of their characters by the time the turntable bed-and-bar set has gone full-circle once again at the end of the play.

Trimble, especially, turns in an emotionally sensitive, natural performance that lends a quality of nobility to the unassuming Will.

He’s the proverbial “little guy” who, proud of what he does, still knows the value of dreaming of something better. And finding it with someone else. In what turns out an engaging, lovely play.

bclark@calgaryherald.coms

© Copyright (c) The Calgary Herald

Read more:
http://www.calgaryherald.com/business/Check+Super+engaging+stay/6137799/story.html#ixzz1m7oZlYVK

Kelly Reay on directing a world premiere production

Blog Entry,Super 8,Video Interviews — Maeike van Dijk @ February 9th, 2012

I did a little interview with Kelly Reay, director of Super 8, about directing new work. Where the playwrights might come to rehearsals, and changes may be made.

Calgary Herald Interview with Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto

Articles and Reviews,Super 8 — Maeike van Dijk @ February 6th, 2012

Super 8 playwrights had to be super speedy

 BY STEPHEN HUNT FEBRUARY 6, 2012 2:08

Playwrights Mark Hopkins, left and Charles Netto’s new play is set in bar at Super 8 Motel and opens this week at Lunchbox Theatre. Photo by Gavin Young, Calgary Herald.


Some plays are inspired by history — personal, national or military. Some arrive in the world commissioned by whoever’s paying.

Super 8 came from a prop and a quote.

Lunchbox Theatre’s newest production, which first sprang from the quills of Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto around this time in 2010, was created as part of the 10 Minute Play Festival, a 24-hour marathon in which local theatre companies create, write, rehearse and stage a 10-minute play in 24 hours.

The prop (which every group also received) was a clock, and the quote, according to Hopkins, was one misattributed to Dr. Seuss: “Don’t cry that it’s over. Smile that it’s happened.”

Each group gets handed their inspiration Friday night, then sets to work.

“I was handwriting (scenes),” says Netto. “(Then) Mark was typing (them). I started directing the first scenes while Mark was still writing the second scene.”

“Total insanity,” says Hopkins.

That’s a pretty wide-open canvas to begin with, but Hopkins and Netto are pretty imaginative guys.

They’re the co-founders of the Swallow-a-Bicycle Theatre Company, a local collective of actors, writers and artists who stage performance creation shows at various site specific locations around town. Their highest profile gig has been producing the Freak Show and its subsequent sequels at the last five High Performance Rodeos, as well as last year’s iRobot.

Additionally, this year, Hopkins associate produced the entire High Performance Rodeo, and is the man behind We Should Know Each Other, a bi-weekly house party he hosts at which he hopes to one day meet everyone in the city.

If anyone could turn a Dr. Seuss quote and a clock into a story, it was these two guys.

And it started, as these things often do, with an image, followed by many hours of panic, writing, rewriting and finally, exhaustion.

“We had talked about a man on a highway who sees the yellow neon glow of a Super 8 sign,” says Netto. “And that got us — especially Mark — looking into intricate details about Super 8.

“About two in the morning,” he adds, “we came up with the idea of someone making ridiculous complaints at a Super 8, and just started asking ourselves what were the silliest complaints one could come up with at a Super 8?”

That set in motion the 10 minute version of Super 8, which generated such strong buzz that Netto submitted it to Lunchbox’s Suncor Energy Festival of New Work play development program.

Much to Netto’s shock, he received a phone call shortly thereafter from Lunchbox artistic director Pamela Halstead.

“I remember getting the phone call,” Netto, “and it’s not like I always think this, but she said hey, it’s Pam from Lunchbox, and the honest thought in my head was, you don’t need to call me to tell me we’re not in. It never for a second crossed my mind that she would take us up on this little gem of ours.”

Halstead delivered good and almost-good news: the play had been selected for its reading series (good). The catch? The playwrights needed to expand it into an hour long script in a single work week.

Although considering the play’s birth story, a whole work week may have seemed like an eternity.

The upshot of it all: working with a generous group of theatrical collaborators, including actors David LeReaney, Karen Johnson-Diamond, dramaturge Sheri Wattling, and Halstead, the young playwrights crafted an additional 50 minutes of material in four days (at the same time they were performing a play that Swallow a Bicycle had been commissioned to do in Vulcan).

The play, which now features David Trimble and Kira Bradley as a pair of lonely wanderers who meet in the lounge of a Super 8, is a testament, Hopkins says, to the collaborative nature of this city’s theatre community, where everyone, it sometimes seems, chips in to work on each other’s new work.

“We were really lucky,” Hopkins says. “You couldn’t ask for a better collaborators — to have Shari Wattling as your dramaturge? To have David and Karen as your actors? The feedback we were getting in those sessions was just incredible.”

“The amount of incredible Calgary actors we’ve had working on this has been amazing,” adds Netto.

And while it’s a little mainstream to go from producing a site specific freak show to writing a show for Lunchbox, Hopkins sees the move down theatre row as one more step in his theatrical and personal journey — for one thing, there’s a lot of Lunchbox patrons he hasn’t met yet that he can now invite to his We Should Know Each Other parties.

“It’s such an honour,” Hopkins says. “We’ve really been embraced by the theatre community here. It’s really cool to see it being done by Lunchbox Theatre.”

Preview: Lunchbox Theatre presents Super 8 by Mark Hopkins & Charles Netto at Lunchbox Theatre through Feb. 25. Tickets and info: lunchobxtheatre.com or 403-265-4292

shunt@calgaryherald.com

twitter.com/halfstep

© Copyright (c) The Calgary Herald

Read more:http://www.calgaryherald.com/entertainment/Super+playwrights+super+speedy/6109705/story.html#ixzz1ldnWGmm8

Super 8 – Charles Netto’s Fantastic Tattoo

Blog Entry,Super 8 — Maeike van Dijk @ February 1st, 2012

Charles Netto must be one of the most dedicated playwrights. To mark the premiere of Super 8, he got a tattoo! Of the epilogue of the play. Check it out to the right and below.

Charles posted it on Facebook earlier today and some of the reaction is absolutely priceless. The Calgary theatre community is now concerned about dramaturgs getting their hands on Super 8 at this point and insisting on edits to the last scene:

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151193058420538&set=a.10150571329675538.663696.792075537&type=1&theater

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151193067790538&set=a.10150571329675538.663696.792075537&type=1&theater

Now this is dedication!

Media Release: Super 8 by Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto

Media Release,Super 8 — Maeike van Dijk @ January 18th, 2012

Press Release/Media Call
For Immediate Release – January 18th 2011

Quirky Comedy by Calgary Playwriting Team Premieres at Lunchbox

Super 8 by Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto

Calgary, AB – Lunchbox Theatre’s season of Calgary playwrights continues in February with the world premiere of Super 8, a quirky love story by local playwrights Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto, Co-Artistic Directors of Swallow-a-Bicycle Theatre. Super 8 was featured in the 2010 Suncor Energy Stage One Festival and won the Theatre Alberta Playwriting Competition’s 2011 Discovery Prize, which included a workshop as part of the Playworks Ink conference. Super 8 runs February 6 to 25, 2012 and features Kira Bradley and Dave Trimble with direction by Kelly Reay.

“ When Mark and Charles submitted Super 8 for Stage One it was only ten minutes long – a draft they had used for a 10 minute play festival – but the writing was good and the idea had a lot of potential,” says Pamela Halstead, Lunchbox Theatre’s Artistic Director. “I programmed it as a wild card and the boys wrote like maniacs all week and it turned out to be one of the hits of the festival that year.”

The show opens with a mysterious traveler arriving at a Super 8 motel and getting a drink at the lounge, where a lonely woman has her habitual night cap. Tomorrow is a big day for Super 8 with the unveiling of the new Super 8 logo and the upgrade to hotel status. The two get to talking and getting to know each other better (with some additional help from the recently introduced $9 “Intimacy Kit”) and discover some surprises along the way. Super 8 is a quirky look at love, loneliness and life on the road.

Super 8 features Dave Trimble as Will and Kira Bradley as Angie. The production team includes director Kelly Reay, lighting designer Dave Smith, set and costume designer Julia Wasilewski, sound designer Christian Goutsis, and stage manager Kelsey ter Kuile. Super 8 runs February 6th to February 25th, Monday to Saturday at 12:10 pm, Fridays at 6:10 pm and Saturdays at 7:30 pm. Tickets are available at the Lunchbox Theatre box office, by phone at 403-265-4292 x 0 or at tickets.lunchboxtheatre.com.

The world’s longest running lunchtime theatre, Lunchbox Theatre is a professional company that caters to downtown office workers over the noon-hour by producing seven plays per season, as well as the Suncor Energy Stage One Festival and the Emerging Director Program. Lunchbox Theatre is located at the base of the Calgary Tower.

Media are invited to a Media Call on Monday, February 6 at 1:15 pm.

1:15 pm – B-Roll of Super 8 (2 minute scene)
1:30 pm – Interviews as requested with actors Dave Trimble and Kira Bradley, playwrights Mark Hopkins and Charles Netto or Super 8 director Kelly Reay.

www.lunchboxtheatre.com

For more information, to RSVP, or to request an interview:
Kathryn Blair
Marketing and Communications
Lunchbox Theatre
403 265 4292 x 229
kathryn.blair@lunchboxtheatre.com

 

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